Does USPS Hire Felons?

People commit mistakes and most are capable of changing their ways if given the chance. For a felon, the first step towards redemption is to be able to support himself by being employed.

Although it is illegal for companies to have policies against hiring ex-convicts, felon applicants still get the same cold treatment from employers, almost like they do not exist at all.

About USPS

United States Postal Service (USPS) is an independent agency being governed by the US federal government and is responsible for providing postal service.

Postal service system started during the early years of North American colonies. In 1970, President Richard Nixon signed the Postal Reorganization Act which then replaced the cabinet-level Post Office Department with a new federal agency, the United States Postal Service.

As of January 13, 2016, USPS employs 625,113 people all over the United States. Each year, USPS recognizes their employees’ efforts in going the extra mile to provide top-notch service.

USPS offers competitive basic salary, night differential and Sunday premium pay to employees. They also offer extensive amount of employment benefits such as health insurance with dental and vision coverage, life insurance, and retirement plan. 

People choose to continue working with USPS because of the benefits they provide during and after an employee had rendered service. Also, employees are allowed to make their own decisions in their line of work, which give them the autonomy.

Does USPS Hire Felons?

USPS Handbook EL-312, Section 514 requires background checks and a review of criminal history. It also states that a felony does not automatically disqualifies a candidate to apply for an open position.

The nature of the felony will always be taken into consideration. The application will most likely be rejected if the history of the criminal conviction is directly related to the applicant’s present capacity to perform.

Other factors that USPS consider during the evaluation of the application is the length of time elapsed since the felon’s offense, and the course of action taken during the time of conviction.

The fact that an applicant has been convicted of a felony is not sufficient for USPS to bar an applicant from being hired.

Application Process At USPS

USPS only takes online application. An applicant must be patient in waiting for an update from the recruitment officer because they receive thousands of applications everyday. Below is a quick guide for the USPS application process.

  • Visit USPS Careers
  • You can create a candidate profile and select “Job Opportunities” then select “Job Search”
  • If you haven’t made a profile yet, simply click on “Search for Jobs online”
  • Search for the vacancy
  • Locate job listing
  • Click the blue underlined job title to display the job listing onscreen
  • Click the “Apply” button at the top of the screen
  • Fill out the application form and attach a copy of your resume
  • Submit once finished
  • Once your application is received, USPS will carefully review it
  • Monitor your email closely for communication from USPS regarding the next step of your application process

Tips To Apply At USPS

Prepare for your face-to-face interview as soon as you are given the date and location. Answering interview questions about your conviction can be stressful so you have to get yourself ready.

You may find yourself in an uncomfortable situation as if you are being put on the spot, but do not attempt to lie about your past. Companies like USPS conduct thorough background checks before they hire an employee.

When the issue comes up during the interview, explain it briefly and do not give too much information. Answer the question directly and focus on the positive things that kept you busy during the time of your conviction.

Lastly, take every opportunity to show the interviewer that you have learned from your mistakes and you are now ready to begin a new chapter of your life.

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Does UPS Hire Felons?

Getting a job after being convicted of a felony is tough. Often times, the interviewer will not hear your explanation...

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